24/7 Emergency Plumbing

(949) 393-0933

Water pressure can be elusive. Many times low water pressure in your home or at your business can be frustrating. Here is some information on water pressure, what affects the pressure of your water, and simple ways to improve water pressure.

Water Pressure: Definition

Water pressure is measured in water weight or water force per unit area. A common analogy used to describe water pressure is that it’s like the water level of a reservoir. If you were to pour water into a container, and no extra space was available for the water, eventually the container would burst from too much water pouring out at once- this can be similar to how high your faucet will shoot up when turned on full blast if there isn’t enough room for all of the water coming through! In simple terms, low drinking fountain flow rates are typically caused by an unfixed clog somewhere along its path. This causes part or most of your plumbing system to lose some amount of pressure as it tries to push around air bubbles instead of water!

Reasons for Low Water Pressure

There are many reasons why water pressure can be low, and sometimes it’s not something you need to worry about. When water flows through a hose or water line, the water needs somewhere to go as it moves forward; this creates what is called “hydrostatic pressure”. The amount of water that comes out at one time from your faucet depends on two things: how strong your water system is (its ability for pushing against resistance) and how much weight there already is in the tube before adding more water into the mix- if too much weight exists inside of a container with no room for expansion than all hell breaks loose. This hydrostatic pressure increases by 0.433 pounds per square inch every foot vertically downwards along its path in a water line. If you have a hidden water leak, such as a leak in your slab foundation, this can also lead to low water pressure.

Why Is Water Pressure Important?

Water pressure is important because it helps water to flow from the water meter or well, through your pipes and into your home or business. Water pressure also allows water to reach high areas such as the second floor of a building. Low water pressure can cause problems with appliances that use water, such as dishwashers and washing machines. It can also prevent you from taking a shower or using the sink. Improving low water pressure is usually easy and inexpensive.

There are several things that you can do to improve low water pressure:

  • Check for leaks in your plumbing system and fix them.
  • Clean out any sediment build-up in your faucet aerators or showerheads.
  • Make sure that all of your faucets are turned on fully.
  • Repair any water leaks in your home or business.
  • Install a water pressure booster pump.

If you have tried these things and still have low water pressure, you may need to call a plumber to investigate the cause of the problem. Low water pressure can be caused by a clogged drain, a broken water pipe, or a malfunctioning water heater. It is important to find out what is causing the low water pressure so that it can be fixed. Fixing low water pressure will help ensure that you have reliable access to water when you need it.

Water Pressure Related Terms

  • Hydrostatic Pressure – The amount of force water exerts on water lines as it moves from the water meter or well, through your pipes and into your home. Hydrostatic pressure increases by 0.433 pounds per square inch every foot vertically downwards along its path in a water line.
  • Water Pressure – The amount of force water exerts on water lines as it flows from the water meter or well to homes and businesses.
  • Low Water Pressure – A common plumbing problem that can cause low water pressure is a clog somewhere within the plumbing system which causes part or all of your plumbing system to lose some amount of pressure as it tries to push around air bubbles instead of water!
  • Pressure Booster Pump – Increases incoming household water pressures by using an electric motor-driven pump installed at one’s main water line entrance to create an increase in water pressure.
  • Sediment build-up – The accumulation of deposits, especially calcium carbonate, from water or other fluid that has passed over a surface or through a medium.
  • Faucet Aerators – A device screwed onto the end of a faucet that mixes air with water coming out of the faucet. This increases the water’s force and helps save water by creating an aerated stream which is more efficient than a non-aerated stream.
  • Shower Heads – A shower head is designed to distribute water evenly over your body when taking a shower. Showerheads come in many different shapes and sizes and can be from plastic, metal, or rubber.

Why Choose Us?

VIEW OUR SERVICES

Call Us Today!

We’re available 24/7 for all of your plumbing needs!

CALL: (949) 393-0933